Epigenetics

Epigenetics

New England Biolabs has called upon its 35 years of expertise in enzymology to develop a suite of validated reagents for epigenetics research. This line of easy-to-use EpiMark® kits simplifies DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation detection and analysis, as well as ChIP, histone and nucleosome analysis. Independently applicable, individual epigenetics reagents also complement the EpiMark® kits. NEB's methylation- and hydroxymethylation- sensitive or dependent enzymes, DNA methyltransferases and DNA controls are all useful for mapping DNA modifications and methylating DNA at specific sites for gene expression studies. Our protein methyltransferases and recombinant histones perform efficiently in protein modification and characterization studies. Our range of modified and unmodified genomic DNAs can be used as controls for detection of DNA methylation. Our series of human DNA (cytosine-5) methyltransferase (DNMT) antibodies are ideally suited for Western blots and immunoprecipitation.

Our complete Epigenetics suite is expertly designed for optimized research and discovery.

EpiMark® is a registered trademark of New England Biolabs, Inc.
  1. Restriction Enzymes in Chromatin Conformation Capture

    Chromatin conformation capture (3C) techniques allow study of the spatial organization of eukaryotic chromosomes in a 3D context. Learn more about this and other applications of restriction enzymes.

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Epigenetics includes these subcategories:

Antibodies
Control DNA
Epigenetic Analysis (Epimark® Validated)
Histones
Methylation Dependent Restriction Enzymes for Epigenetics
Methylation-Sensitive Restriction Enzymes for Epigenetics
Methyltransferases for Epigenetics

Types of Histone Modifications

Amino Acid Modification
Lysine Methylation, Acetylation,
Ubiquitination, Sumoylation,
ADP-Ribosylation
Arginine Methylation
Serine Phosphorylation
Threonine Phosphorylation

Types of DNA Modifications

References

  1. Kim, J.K., Samaranayake, M. and Pradhan S. (2009) Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 66, 596-612. PMID: 18985277
  2. Vanyushin, B.F. (2006) Curr. Top. Microbiol. Immunol. 301, 67-122. PMID: 16570846
  3. Mosher, R.A., Melnyk, C.W. (2010) Trends Plant Sci. 15, 204-210. PMID: 20129810
  4. Lyko, F., Beisel, C., Marhold, J., Paro, R. (2006) Curr. Top. Microbiol. Immunol. 310, 23-44. PMID: 16909905
  5. Selker, E.U., Freitag, M., Kothe, G.O., et al. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U S A. 99, Suppl 4, 16485-16490. PMID: 12189210
  6. Kriaucionis, S. and Heintz, N. (2009) Science 324, 929-930. PMID: 19372393
  7. Tahiliani, M., Koh, K. P., Shen, Y., et al. (2009) Science 324, 930-935. PMID: 19372391
  8. Ehrlich, M., Wilson, G.G., Kuo, K.C., And Gehrke, C.W. (1987) J. Bacteriol. 169, 939-943. PMID: 3029036
  9. Svadbina, I.V., Zelinskaya, N.V., Kovalevskaya, N.P., Zheleznaya, L.A. and Matvienko, N.I. (2004) Biochem. (Moscow) 69, 299-305. PMID: 15061697
  10. Ratel, D., Ravanat, J-L., Berger, F. and Wion D. (2006) Bioessays 28, 309-315. PMID: 16479578
  11. Marinus, M.G. and Casadesus, J. (2009) FEMS Microbiol. Rev. 33, 488-503. PMID: 19175412

ChIP-Seq Library Construction Workflow